Computer and Information Sciences (CISC)



114 Introduction to Computer Graphics and Web Media - 1.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 2 units (Grade Only)

This course offers a hands-on introduction to the fundamental concepts, current applications and state-of-the art hardware and software in computer graphics and computer visualization technology. Students use professional authoring software to design, develop, debug and document computer presentations for use in business and the world wide web. Hands-on introduction to computer graphics. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

121 Introduction to Operating Systems - .75 hour lecture, .75 hour lab, 1 unit (Grade Only)

This course is an introductory hands-on study of computer operating systems for general users. Emphasis is placed on the commands and utilities necessary for effective use of computer systems. This course may be offered for Disk Operating System (DOS), Macintosh, Microsoft Windows, OS/2, and Unix. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

128 Introduction to Computer Presentations - .75 hour lecture, .75 hour lab, 1 unit (Grade Only)

This course is an introductory hands-on study of current applications, hardware and software used to prepare effective presentations on desktop computers. Emphasis is placed on planning, designing, developing, presenting, and evaluating slide, overhead, and computer projection presentations using a combination of text and graphics. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

130 Introduction to Local Area Networks .75 hour lecture, .75 hour lab, 1 unit (Grade Only)

This is an introductory study of microcomputer local area and wide area network development, use and administration. Emphasis is placed on presenting students with a breadth of knowledge from wiring to applications and including hardware, software, transmission media, packets, frames, network topology, routing, protocols and layering. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

132 Intermediate Local Area Networking - .75 hour lecture, .75 hour lab, 1 unit (Grade Only)

This course is an introductory study of Internetworking and network applications. Emphasis is placed on presenting students with a breadth of knowledge from wiring to applications and including Internet architecture, protocols, datagrams, routing, the client server model, electronic mail, web document technologies, network management and security. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

150 Introduction to Computer and Information Sciences - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Grade Only)

This course is a survey of computers, computer systems and information sciences. Emphasis is placed on the use of computers in business and technical fields. Topics include computer equipment and programming systems, systems study, design, development and implementation. This course is intended for all students interested in computers and how to use them. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

152 Introduction to the Linux Operating System - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Pass/No Pass Only)

Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with credit for Computer and Information Sciences 151.
This introductory course to the Linux Operating systems is for new users to learn the programs and services that made the Linux System so increasingly popular, including: the shell, communicating to other users, manipulating files using the file structure, setting file access permissions, full-screen text editing, and programming simple shell scripts. The Novell SuSE Linux implementation is used in the course, but other versions of Linux are also appropriate. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

161 Software Project Management - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: Computer and Information Sciences 181 or 182, 186, 187, 190, 192, 193 or Mathematics 107 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent.
This course prepares computer science, information technology, information systems, and software engineering students with a thorough introduction to the tools and techniques associated with managing software development projects. This knowledge is required in any substantive software development project. This course assumes adequate understanding of the process of software development. It also requires access to, and the use of, Microsoft Project, a software tool that is part of the Microsoft Office family. This course is of interest to students majoring in the areas cited above, and to professional development students seeking to expand their knowledge and skills in software development management. (FT) AA/AS; CSU.

181 Principles of Information Systems - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: English 47A or English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5. This course is an introduction to basic principles and theory relating to problem solving and analysis in business organizations using computers and software packages. Emphasis is placed on computer organization, data processing systems, decision support systems, and systems analysis. Business software is reviewed with an emphasis on spreadsheet systems including hands-on spreadsheet applications. This course is intended for the transfer student planning to major in business, economics, or social science. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

186 Visual Basic Programming - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: English 49 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Level W5.
This course is an introduction to programming using Visual Basic. The course covers the fundamentals of event oriented programming in a Windows environment. Students learn to use and program a mouse, windows, forms, menus, dialog boxes, icons, buttons, text fields, files, graphics, and other components of a Windows environment in Visual Basic. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

187 Data Structures and Object-Orientation - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

This course introduces students to the topic of data structures and object-oriented software engineering. It covers basic data structures such as collections and linked structures (e.g. stacks, queues, lists, arrays, trees, and hashes) from the perspective of object-oriented implementation. It discusses issues of object-oriented analysis, design, and implementation in popular programming languages such as C++, C#, and Java. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

189A Introduction to Programming I - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: English 49 and Mathematics 46, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent. or Assessment Skill Levels W5 and M40; Computer and Information Sciences 150 or 181, each with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent;
Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer Information Sciences 190-Java Programming. Using the popular programming language Java, this course introduces students to the process of developing simple software applications to solve typical human problems. This includes language syntax, structure, and semantics as well as the basics of object-oriented software engineering. CISC 189A and B together are a slower-paced version of CISC 190, with more programming practice. CISC 189A is the first of the two-course sequence. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Computer and Information Sciences (CISC) 189A and 189B are equal to 190. No credit for 189A or 189B if taken after 190 (per catalog).

189B Introduction to Programming II - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Prerequisite: Computer and Information Sciences 189A with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent.
Limitation on Enrollment: This course is not open to students with previous credit for Computer and Information Sciences 190-Java Programming. Using the popular programming language Java, this course continues the process of students learning how to solve business problems by developing useful software applications. This includes more advanced concepts like abstract data structures, graphics, and data persistence. CISC 189A and B together are a slower-paced version of CISC 190, with more programming practice. CISC 189B is the second of the two-course sequence. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC Transfer Limitation: Computer and Information Sciences (CISC) 189A and 189B are equal to 190. No credit for 189A or 189B if taken after 190 (per catalog).

190 Java Programming - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: English 48, English 49 and Mathematics 34A, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R5, W5 and M20. Computer and Information Sciences 186 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent. This course is an introduction to programming using Java. The course covers the fundamentals of object-oriented programming utilizing the Java programming language for general purpose business programs and interactive World Wide Web-based Internet programs. This course is intended for students majoring in computer and information sciences or anyone interested in the Java programming language. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

192 C/C++ Programming - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: English 49 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Level W5; and Computer and Information Sciences 186 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
This course presents basic programming concepts using the C++ programming language. The organization of standard I/O classes is emphasized. Structured and object oriented programming techniques are presented and used to design and implement a variety of programming problems. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

193 Microsoft C# Software Engineering 1 - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

This course applies industry-standard software engineering principles to the study of the object-oriented, general purpose programming language Microsoft C#, a member of the Microsoft Visual Studio.NET software development toolset. Coverage includes the typical topics of an introductory programming course. Extensive hands-on training is included in the laboratory sessions. This course can be offered in-class or online. This course is designed for students pursuing a degree in Computer Science or Information Systems and for vocational/professional students who are updating their programming skills set. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

205 Object Oriented Programming Using C++ - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

This course introduces students to Object Oriented Programming (OOP) using the C++ programming language and includes the essential concepts related to OOP including use of classes and objects, inheritance, templates, polymorphism, pointers and references, and I/O streams. This course is intended for students majoring in Computer and Information Sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

210 System Analysis and Design - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels W6 and R6.
This course is an introductory, experiential study of the phases of the object-oriented software development life cycle (OOSDLC), including: stakeholder and requirements analysis; use cases development; software architecture; project management; user interface considerations; interactive and prototyping methodology; component construction; quality assurance; and configuration management. This course is intended for students seeking advanced knowledge and applications in Computer and Information Sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

220 Fundamentals of Computer Game Programming - 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 4 units (Grade Only)

Advisory: Computer and Information Sciences 187 or 190 or 192 or 193, with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent.
This course introduces software programmers to the design and development of simple graphical computer-based games. The course may use Java or C# as the programming language of choice. Emphasis is placed on developing games in a team environment, designing logical games that satisfy player needs, and on ensuring that games are of high quality through use of software engineering best practices and proper testing. This course is for students with some previous software programming experience. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

290 Independent Study - Hours by Arrangement, 1-3 units (Grade Only)

Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from instructor for registration.
Typically for advanced students in Computer and Information Sciences who wish to pursue special problems and projects related to the area. The student will meet with the instructor at specific intervals and will be expected to accomplish primary research, problem analysis and report preparation relating to an approved project or course of study. This course may be taken four times with different content for a maximum of six units. AA/AS; CSU.

This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 120. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.