Philosophy (PHIL)



100 Logic and Critical Thinking - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6 or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
This course explores the relationship of communications and critical thinking with a focus on good reasoning and impediments to its mastery. It emphasizes the development of skills in logical analysis including familiarity with the more common fallacies. This course is designed for students learning to apply principles of critical thinking to the practical problems of everyday life. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

101 Symbolic Logic - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Prerequisite: Philosophy 100 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
Advisory: English 101 and Mathematics 96, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels W6, R6 and M50.
This course is a study of the elements of symbolic logic, sentential calculus and quantification theory. Topics include identity, definite descriptions, natural deduction and structure of language. This course is intended for philosophy majors and students pursuing studies in computer science. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID PHIL 210.

102A Introduction To Philosophy: Reality and Knowledge - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.
This course is an introductory study of the aims, methods, types and problems of philosophy and philosophical inquiry. Emphasis is placed on the nature of reality and knowledge. Materials for this survey of philosophy may draw from classical and contemporary thinkers. Students are encouraged to articulate, analyze, and evaluate their own beliefs/ positions in the context of meaningful philosophical inquiry. This course is intended for anyone concerned with human existence and humanity’s place in the universe. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID PHIL 100.

102B Introduction to Philosophy: Values - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6 or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
This course provides an introductory study of the aims, methods, types and problems of philosophy focusing on values and their place in an individual’s daily life. Materials for this survey may be drawn from classical and contemporary thinkers. Students are encouraged to articulate, analyze, and evaluate their own beliefs/positions in the context of meaningful philosophical inquiry regarding value theory. This course is for anyone interested in the origin and justification of values and their application to everyday life. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC; C-ID PHIL 120.

104A History of Western Philosophy - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.
This course is an introduction to the issues and problems exemplified in the process of meaningful philosophical activity related to the history of western philosophy from the pre-Socratics to the close of the Medieval age. Students in this course survey representative theories and philosophical reflections related to the history of early western philosophy. Students are encouraged to engage in independent research, analysis and formulation. This course is intended for students pursuing studies in History and Humanities, and anyone interested in the history of western philosophy. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

104B History of Western Philosophy - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.
This course is an introduction to the issues and problems exemplified in the process of meaningful philosophical activity related to the history of western philosophy from the Renaissance period through the 19th Century. Students in this course survey representative theories and philosophical reflections related to the history of philosophy in the Renaissance and/or Modern periods. Students are encouraged to engage in independent research, analysis and formulation. This course is intended for students pursuing studies in History and Humanities, and anyone interested in the history of western philosophy. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

105 Contemporary Philosophy - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6; or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
This course explores the issues and problems associated with philosophy in the 20th and 21st centuries. Emphasis is placed on the representative thinkers of the modern and post-modern eras. Students are encouraged to engage in independent research, analysis and formulation. This course is designed for students interested in contemporary society and current events. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

106 Asian Philosophy - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6.
This course explores issues in the philosophical study of Asian philosophy, including questions relating to the nature of the universe, the status and meaning of humankind, and the qualities characterizing the good life. This course may be of special interest to students pursuing Pacific Rim or International Studies. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

107 Reflections on Human Nature - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6 or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
This course is an introductory study of the issues and problems exemplified in the process of meaningful philosophical activity relating to the topic of human nature. Students in this course survey representative theories and philosophical reflections relating to the notions of human nature, the individual person, and human characteristics in general. Material for this survey may be drawn from classical and contemporary thinkers or scientific and religious orientations. Students are encouraged to engage in independent research, analysis and formulation. This course is intended for students pursuing studies in behavioral and/or social sciences. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

108 Perspectives on Human Nature and Society - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.
This course is an introduction to the issues and problems exemplified in the process of meaningful philosophical activity relating to the topics of human nature and human societal configurations. Students in this course survey representative theories and philosophical reflections related to the notions of human nature and human societal configurations such as the nature of society, the state, and government, with an emphasis on experiential elements of meaningful human existence, and notions of ideal society. Students are encouraged to engage in independent research, analysis and formulation. This course is intended for students pursuing studies in behavioral, social or political science, and anyone interested in philosophy of human nature. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

111 Philosophy in Literature - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory:English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.
This course is an introduction to the issues and problems exemplified in the process of meaningful philosophical activity related to philosophy in literature. Students in this course survey representative theories and philosophical reflections related to the philosophical issues and themes in selected classical and/or contemporary literature such as the nature of reality, the notion of the self, the issue of choice and determinism, the problem of good and evil, the characteristics of the good life. Students are encouraged to engage in independent research, analysis and formulation. This course is intended for students pursuing studies in literature or in the Behavioral and/or Social Sciences, and anyone interested in philosophy in literature. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

125 Philosophy of Women - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 or English 105, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.
This course is an introduction to the issues and problems exemplified in the process of meaningful philosophical activity related to philosophy of women. Students in this course survey representative theories and philosophical reflections related to philosophy of women such as concepts of womanhood and feminism as they have found expression in mythic, classic, medieval and major modern philosophical traditions. Students are encouraged to engage in independent research, analysis and formulation. The course is intended for students pursuing women’s studies and/or political, behavioral or social sciences, and anyone interested in philosophy of women. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

126 Introduction to Philosophy of Contemporary Gender Issues - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Level R6 and W6.
This course provides an introduction to the concepts of gender and gender relations for the student interested in the development of contemporary gender issues as they relate to philosophy. The images, roles, and beliefs about gender and gender relations as they vary across cultures will be explored with respect to their impact in our everyday lives and the larger societies within which we live. This course may be of special interest to students going into gender studies and women’s studies. (FT) AA/ AS; CSU; UC.

130 Philosophy of Art and Music - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6; or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
This course employs philosophical methods to explore the concepts, principles, and criteria used in the creation and evaluation of art and music. In addition to students interested in philosophy, this course is designed for any student seeking to gain a better understanding of why we appreciate art and music and how we develop standards for evaluating them. A variety of arts may be discussed including painting, sculpture, architecture, design, music, dance, theatre, and literature. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

205 Critical Thinking and Writing in Philosophy - 3 hours lecture, 3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 101 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R6 and W6; or English 105 with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent.
This critical thinking and writing seminar in Philosophy is designed to enhance the student’s critical thinking, writing, and research skills in preparation for upper division academic activity. Issues addressed in this class may involve various areas of human experience and aspiration: metaphysical, cosmological, scientific, political, ethical, aesthetic, and religious. Together with the application of basic principles of deduction and induction, special attention is given to identifying and avoiding fallacies in reasoning and to techniques and aids to research, reasoning, and writing. (FT) AA/AS; CSU; UC.

290 Independent Study - Hours by Arrangement, 1-3 units (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass Option)

Advisory: English 48 and English 49, each with a grade of “C” or better, or equivalent, or Assessment Skill Levels R5 and W5.
Limitation on Enrollment: Must obtain an Add Code from instructor for registration.
For students who wish to study special problems. AA/AS; CSU.

296 Individual Instruction in Philosophy - 1.5 - 6 hours lab, .5 - 2 units (Pass/No Pass Only)

Limitation on Enrollment: Enrollment in an approved related course; Must obtain an Add code from instructor for registration.
This course employs self-paced multimedia systems to assist students to reach specific learning objectives, and is intended to be supplementary to designated courses. AA/AS; CSU.

This discipline may offer specialized instruction in one or more of the following areas: Supervised Tutoring (044), Experimental Topics (265), Independent Study (290), Individualized Instruction (296), Service Learning (277), or Work Experience (270). Detailed course descriptions are listed on page 124. Please refer to the class schedule and/or see the dean or department chair for availability.